6 Months: Pivot Prone

“My 6-month old daughter rocks on her belly and moves her arms all around.  It looks like she is swimming on land!  What is going on while she is playing like that?”

This swimming motion, common during the development of 5-6 month olds, is also known as pivot prone.   The first time you might see something like this would be during a Landau reaction.  The Landau reaction emerges at approximately 3 months as a reflex/postural reaction, allowing the baby to extend against gravity while held at the stomach.  However, by 5-6 months of age, the baby has taken this foundation movement and has developed the strength and flexibility to play with it in a variety of ways while on the floor.  These new sensations and movement keep interest in the activity.

What is happening during this motion?

Continue reading “6 Months: Pivot Prone”

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6 Months: Sidelying With Pelvic Femoral Dissociation

Life is so exciting for the six month old; once she learns to roll to the side, it is fun to play in this position.   Beyond fun for the little one, what special things are happening with development at this stage?  After all, play is child’s work.

  • Mastering the balance of flexion and extension in the trunk:  she is able to play in sidelying without falling forward or backward.
  • Increasing shoulder girdle control and stability- allowing propping on one arm to play.
  • Emergence/increasing lower extremity dissociation: one foot can prop to meet the ground and stabilize in this position.  To do this, one leg must be flexed, the other extended while weight is increasingly shifted to the hip that contacts the floor.
  • Foot weight-bearing: bringing the foot to meet the ground and getting some weight on to different parts of the foot in order to prepare for standing.
  • Lateral flexibility and of the trunk/rib cage.
  • Lateral head righting against gravity.

From this position your little one can grab toys to mouth, providing a whole new level of independence for exploration!  All of these movements build the foundation for transitions that come in later months like progressing to side sitting, getting up on all fours and pulling to stand.